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Becoming a Wise Traveller

Driving safety tips to keep you safe on the road

7 driving safety tips to keep you safe on the road

Road safety is of paramount importance in the trucking industry.

According to the 2018 Driver Safety Risk Report, trucking collisions cost fleets nearly $57 billion — covering expenses such as medical bills, vehicle repairs, and lost productivity due to downtimes.

The report also reveals that annual insurance rates increase by about 33 percent when an employee has a collision that includes damage to both the driver and the vehicle.

Additionally, a road collision without any injuries can increase insurance costs by up to 23 percent. Despite these numbers, only 42.6 percent of carriers employ driver safety programs to lower the risk of road collisions.

Here are seven driving safety tips that can help increase road safety and reduce the risk of collisions.

1. Know where the blind spots are

Visibility is key to preventing road collisions, especially if you’re operating a large commercial vehicle, which has more blind spots than a passenger vehicle.

Minimizing lane changes and checking your side mirrors at least once every 10 seconds can be an effective way to increase safety and road awareness.

It is also important to familiarize yourself with the blind spots not only of your truck but also of other vehicles on the road.

Here is an infographic that will help you understand how a commercial driver has limited visibility on all four sides because of the large blind spots around the front, back, and sides of the vehicle.

Commercial motor vehicle drivers should familiarize themselves with these blind spots and be mindful of these spaces around the vehicle when making turns or changing lanes.

2. Understand safe braking distance

The bigger the rig, the longer it takes to stop. In comparison to an average-sized car, it takes an 18-wheeler 40 percent longer to stop completely. For example, a fully-loaded tractor-trailer that is going on 55 MPH on dry pavement will travel to approximately 390 more feet in 4.5 seconds before stopping.

For new drivers who are accustomed to driving smaller vehicles, it may take some time for them to get used to the braking distance of large commercial vehicles.

It is up to fleets and safety managers to ensure that drivers go through a complete driver training program that talks about these differences in detail.

A road-facing dash cam can also be installed to ensure that drivers are keeping a safe braking distance from other vehicles. Dash cam video footage can be analyzed regularly to see if a driver needs coaching.

3. Avoid distracted driving

Distracted driving is one of the leading causes of road collisions. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that delayed driver reaction causes 90 percent of rear-end collisions.

Truck drivers need to be extra vigilant since they’re operating larger vehicles that are harder to maneuver, take longer to decelerate, and have more blind spots or “No Zones.”

Every manner of distracted driving, be it texting, smoking, or using mobile apps while driving, must be avoided at all costs to increase road safety.

4. Be vigilant of aggressive or reckless tailgaters

Sometimes, the only way to avoid road accidents is to steer clear of other drivers who are either too aggressive or just outright reckless.

Tailgaters, for instance, are drivers who drive too close to your vehicle — depriving themselves the adequate amount of space needed to decelerate in case you need to make a sudden stop.

Instead of accelerating to make way for space, the other driver needs to operate safely. A better approach is to switch to a different lane, if possible, and let the tailgater overtake you. Just don’t forget to use your turn signals and watch out for other vehicles and hazards on the road.

5. Follow all road signs

Road signs are there for a reason.

You don’t just follow speed limits and be aware of the vehicles in front of and around you. You also need to pay close attention to the road signs and local traffic rules in the area. If you are looking for a pre-licencing or just to improve your manual driving skills here is the course for New York drivers.

Truck drivers may occasionally go over the enforced speed limit — especially if they are running late or if they were detained for an extended period of time by a shipper or receiver. Speeding may cause them to lose control of their vehicle when maneuvering through sudden, sharp curves, uneven surfaces, construction hazards, and other road irregularities. Paying close attention to road signs may help significantly.

6. Follow the Hours of Service rules

The Hours of Service rules are there to help drivers, minimize driver fatigue, and increase road safety.

Driver fatigue is one of the leading causes of road collisions. Driving past your Hours of Service limit is not only risky but also leads to HOS violations. Make sure you are always in compliance by following the different Hours of Service regulations.

Here is a list of 5 big driver violations — including Hours of Service violations — and how to avoid them.

7. Avoid hard braking, acceleration, and cornering

Critical safety events, such as hard braking, acceleration, and cornering, are more common than you think.

Fleets can initiate driver training programs to promote good driving habits and reduce the number of hard cornering, hard braking, and excessive acceleration events.

Fleets can also increase road safety by monitoring drivers for critical safety events, such as hard braking, excessive acceleration, and hard cornering. Some Electronic Logging Devices can help simplify and automate that process.

For instance, the KeepTruckin ELD solution has a driver scorecards feature, which can automatically rank drivers according to how safely they drive.

Drivers are ranked based on their safety scores — which is calculated on the basis of the aforementioned critical safety events. With the help of this safety score, safety managers can easily identify drivers who are involved in unsafe driving and behavior and require immediate coaching.

Driver Scorecards and Rankings Based on Safety Scores

Norman Bright, a fleet and safety manager at Woodford Oil, has managed to improve driver behavior with the KeepTruckin technology.

“KeepTruckin Driver Scorecards and Smart Dashcam footage have made our coaching much more effective. In four short months, we’ve seen a significant decrease in critical events, including hard braking events cut in half and an almost 70% reduction in hard accelerations.” — Norman Bright.

Read how Norman Bright improved safety with KeepTruckin.

Stay safe

Although passenger vehicles may be at fault in almost 85 percent of truck-passenger vehicle collisions, commercial drivers are more likely to be blamed. It is, therefore, important for every fleet to build a comprehensive safety program and use technology and data to keep drivers safe.

The next time you are on the road, keep the above-mentioned driver safety tips in mind. For more information and driving safety tips, consult the CDL manual.

What’s the creation story behind every social innovation?


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SiG Note: This article was originally published on The Melting Pot Website.  It has been cross-posted with permission from the author.

Disruption AheadSocial innovators are often the disrupters, the ones who swim against the tide and question the status quo.  We may find them uncomfortable and challenging, but these people are also inspiring, determined and resilient.

Take the ‘Social Innovator personality test.’ How many of these needed core skills and qualities do you have?

Making connections * causing disruptions * having persistence and a critical mindset * clarity of vision * courage of your convictions * an ability to learn and reflect * to take risks and experiment * question results * have focus, but also openness * and, of course – the ability to “sell.”

During 2014, The Melting Pot initiated a collaborative enquiry process into social innovation and how it might flourish in Scotland.

Gatherings took place from Inverness to Edinburgh. Using ‘The Art of Hosting’ participatory processes, we dived into understanding the cultural conditions that help or hinder people, communities and organisations of all sizes who have a passion for creating solutions to our pressing eco-social challenges.

You can read more about our findings here. For fun, here are the recommendations turned on their head.  

How to kill social innovation in 5 easy steps!

First – spot those disrupters and put them down – go on, tell them their mad ideas won’t work.  These non-conformers who wish to do something different are a nuisance with their radical notions. Their dreams are too big, too complex.  They don’t know what they’re doing and it will certainly never make any money!

Second – don’t assist those disruptors, or offer them a chance to collaborate. Keep yourself to yourself.  Don’t move out of your comfort zone, talk to, or help anyone!  Don’t go out of your way to make connections or introductions, you might catch something – like a scary new proposition…

Third – seek out the answers to our societal problems from another place, somewhere like London, New York or Shanghai. Those disruptive ideas under your nose, on your doorstep, the ones that take account of the cultural fit can’t be any good, can they? And anyway, it’s more fun to go on international jollies (sorry, I mean learning journeys).

Forth – never accept anyone else’s wisdom, or seek to learn form them. What do they know anyway? There’s no point taking time out of your busy schedule to reflect on your learning – you’ve just got to keep doing – at all costs.

Fifth – work from your bedroom, alone – you can’t afford anywhere nice and professional to work anyway, not on what is invested into the social innovation pipeline. Yes we need jobs, but they can only be produced from companies that focus on economic growth, not social capital.

Now forget all that. For social innovation to thrive in Scotland, we must create a culture to:

  1. Encourage – literally lend courage and support to – those seeking to address inequality, those who are questioning the status quo, creating disruption and taking risks.
  2. Foster connections, creativity and the generation of ideas amongst innovators in all sectors.  Enabling genuine participation and collaboration across sectors releases socially innovative ideas.
  3. Cultivate local solutions where social innovators can work with communities to define and co-design solutions within their community context.
  4. Create safe places and spaces for learning, reflection and sharing all the stories: the successes, the tricky moments, the failures, the highs and the lows of experience.
  5. Invest in social innovation – provide the physical resources to enable social innovators to work with focus, purpose, determination and persistence. 

Melting PotThe Melting Pot would like to thank the Scottish Government for commissioning this work, so that our policy makers can better harness our people’s talents, energy and ideas to make Scotland flourish.

Find out more about The Melting Pot, Scotland’s Centre for Social Innovation, and our Social Innovation Incubation Award programme (all disrupters please apply!).


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