Reconciling Myself for Reconciliation in Canada

Photo by Miriam Espacio

Just before daybreak, on a September morning, I stand in a small circle of people around a sacred fire on Ambleside Beach in Vancouver. As the light creeps into the eastern sky, I hold hands with the stranger next to me, while listening to the calls of the ravens and gulls overhead. Reconciliation Canada has gathered us for this Sunrise Ceremony to call our ancestors, those who have passed from this earthly existence, to ask for their guidance as we move into more active reconciliation conversations and actions.

I stand here, a settler, feeling very unsettled.

I’m unsettled as our country prepares for a year celebrating the birth of a nation that was founded at such great, hurtful expense for the First Nations of this land. To be honest, as a non-indigenous Canadian on the threshold of 2017, I feel guilt and uncertainty – and I worry. The more I find myself in spaces and conversations about reconciliation in Canada, the more I worry that there is so much that I don’t yet know.

I worry that I don’t know for sure what my place is or should be in all of this. I worry that I don’t know what to do. I worry that if I step forward, I will make mistakes that may cause more hurt –  which might be unforgivable. But what I truly worry about most is that all these worries will mean that I do nothing. And that would be, for me, the most unforgivable thing.

The fire ceremony comes to a close and I let go of the stranger’s hand. A little later, at a community breakfast, he approaches me to introduce himself and to tease me that I had gripped his hand so hard that it hurt! I wince – and tell him immediately that I’m so sorry. But he just laughs and takes my hand again for a moment, holds it gently, smiles, tells me he is glad that I was there, and then moves on to speak with others.

In that moment, right there, that kind stranger taught me something about how to make my own way forward towards action for reconciliation. I realized that I need to both let go and go deep; that any contribution I can make to the reconciliation movement will flow, from these same vulnerabilities that worry me.

Image from Reconciliation Canada

It is a realization that I continued to explore through a workshop developed by Reconciliation Canada called Leadership Learning for Reconciliation, which posed a central question; “What does reconciliation mean for YOU?” Through the workshop, I began to understand that the greatest courage required for this work may be to genuinely look within and to get to know the weak, frightened, thoughtless parts of my own self and life  – to own my shadow sides that make me cringe and that I fight to ignore rather than to acknowledge and heal.

I imagine that many of us have relationships in our lives that need reconciliation – I know for sure that I do.  I’m beginning to understand that the way I think about them, the way I have or have not tried to address my damaged and hurting personal relationships, is my starting point to learn how to become better prepared, able and ready to work for broader reconciliation efforts in society. Maybe we need to reconcile what we each know as ‘mine’ before we can effectively connect together to heal histories, hurts, and troubling issues that are ‘ours’.

Photo from the inaugural Indigenous Innovation Summit, Raven Lacerte and Paul Lacerte, who started The Moose Hide Campaign, honour Justice Sinclair by presenting him with a drum. (Photo by the NAFC)

I believe we have to find a way to come to terms with our own worries about what we will each do for reconciliation. We need to reconcile ourselves, with all the grace we can muster, to the unavoidable challenges that are part of reconciliation efforts. We need to accept that we are bound to make mistakes in this new part of our shared journey in Canada. We cannot be sure of every step, but we need to show up anyway.

We will need courage and humility to be called on errors and to experience some pain and remorse at our own failings. We need to trust that we can ask for forgiveness and be generous in offering forgiveness to others. We need to focus on holding empathy for each other, learning from each other, trying together to find the way forward. Trying again. And again.

We won’t be able to do this alone and we will need help along the way. The most inspiring support that I’ve encountered is the immense generosity of some amazing indigenous leaders in Canada. Particularly at the two Indigenous Innovation Summits that I’ve had the privilege to attend, I’ve witnessed the authentic, generous words and actions of people like Paul Lacerte, Karen Joseph, Jessica Bolduc and Melanie Goodchild, to name just a few. They are choosing to bravely speak truths, positive and negative, and to do so with love and faith.

Truths about what has been and what now needs to be.

Love for all who try to think, speak and act differently.

Faith that we can do this thing called reconciliation.

They encourage me in very profound ways that lessen my worries and help me to step forward into the work ahead.

LabWISE on Trust and why it matters in a Social Innovation Lab Process

 SiG Note: This article was originally published on the RECODE Blog.  It has been cross-posted with permission. 

LabWISE is priming collaborative groups to create big changes to major challenges across the country. Launched in mid October, the LabWISE program is a partnership with the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and the Waterloo Institute of Social Innovation and Resilience (WISIR), and is designed to train community-based teams in the WISIR social innovation lab process. It provides ongoing coaching to support Canadian organizations in leading a social innovation lab to tackle intractable social and/or environmental challenges.

Nesting Social Innovation

“What does social innovation mean?”
“Is my work called social innovation?”
“Is that social innovation?”

These types of questions are asked all the time, showing that definitions for promising ideas can be very useful, but also alienating. Too often, they come across as a value judgment, privileging some ideas and actions over others. But what if it’s not really a competition? More than any one individual piece of work, it might be even more important to consider the relationships between them. There is something about the interconnections between intention, involvement, invention and innovation that are central to social innovation.

Intention: it’s sparked by a moment in time when people become more consciously aware of a problem in a way that there’s no turning back from. They are changed and, as individuals, they now genuinely care about something that is broken in the world. They develop a deep intention; they care – and they sincerely want change to happen.

That intention often leads to new levels of engagement; their growing awareness and emotional connection wants to be translated into action and they feel compelled to DO something. Doing can take a lot of forms – learning more, giving money, volunteering, working in the problem domain. Whatever first (and next) steps mean to them, they move into involvement; they are actively helping change to happen.

To some extent, they are now part of the field, part of working for change, and some will get involved enough to develop more knowledge and experience in this realm. This allows them to creatively experiment with new ways of addressing problems. They are excited by invention; they can now imagine and act on radically different ideas for change.

Eventually, a number of these creative, adaptive entrepreneurs, either individuals or organizations, come to realize that even with some success, the fundamental brokenness that caught their attention in the first place, still lingers – the problem has barely changed at all. It becomes clear that their work is critically important, but alone, it is not enough. And, if possible, they turn their attention to whatever bigger picture elements appear to be keeping problems so frustratingly stuck. They, with others, begin to work for innovation; they step into new spaces to engage with strategies for getting at the root causes of these very complex problems.

Babushka Dolls of SI copy

Babushka Dolls of Social Innovation – image graphic provided by Karen Gomez

I’ve come to understand the necessity and the interdependence of each of these four different. but related, uniquely powerful parts of change-making.  I think of them like the Russian babushka dolls; nested pieces, one inside the other. While each individual piece can stand alone, the full impact is really only possible when they are together.  Social innovation nesting looks something like this; real, lasting innovation at a systems level cannot happen without enough creative invention to demonstrate and prepare the new possibilities. This rarely happens without significant involvement to gain deep understanding in the issue area, which itself will never occur without sparking individuals’ intention, their desire to be part of making change happen. When this interconnectedness is present, the energy of a whole field works for impact – and that can make all the difference.

So I’m really drawn to think about the whole – and, therefore, to holistic questions that unite rather than divide our change efforts; ones that point to the relationships between initiatives and to ‘nesting’ one piece of change work within another.  Rather than questions about what is or is not social innovation, let’s explore if and how this kind of initiative and that type of activity fits within, supports, leverages, communicates with, and connects to a whole web-like strategy, every single piece of which has a role to play in achieving real and lasting change.