Witnessing Care: Innovating for Caregivers at SIX 2014

Last week, the annual SIX Summer School was held in North America for the first time, bringing together leading social innovation thinkerspractitioners, grassroots activists, and policy makers from over 20 countries to explore: How can we increase our impact? Shifting cultures, changing systems and preparing for surprise

SIX Vancouver 2014 was a three-day journey into culture shift and the spirit and humanity of social innovationDay 1 and 2  were curated to dive deep into our spirit and our sector experiences, while Day 3 prepared us to surface with fresh perspectives and consider: how can we ‘grow change’ in society and nurture the conditions for social innovation?

To capture the depth and collective wisdom of this journey, six Witnesses were chosen to reflect on and give testimony to the powerful undercurrents of SIX Vancouver: power & love, empathy, generations, courage, beauty, and empowerment. Honouring the oral tradition of the Musqueam People, our hosts on Day 2, each Witness — or Listener — was responsible for listening for and witnessing the truth of his or her theme. 

In two poignant blog posts this week, a seventh witness surfaced: Donna Thomson — an author, activist, and mother — witnessed and listened for care during the Summer School and testifies to care in her writings on SIX:

June 1: Innovating for Caregivers at The SIX Vancouver Summer School

Innovating for Caregivers at The SIX Vancouver Summer School

Innovating for Caregivers at The SIX Vancouver Summer School

The place of care in social change was a theme that ran through every discussion and workshop and we were nudged to think about care through the cultural lens of Canada’s First Nations…” In her first post, Donna reflects on the paradox of ‘real life’ versus ‘real work’ that emerged on Day 2: care is often seen as part of ‘real life,’ but not ‘real work’ — and as a result, can be edged out of our ‘real lives.’ Driven by the fear of our own vulnerability, we might dismiss the vulnerability of others, devalue care, and forget that love and care are both the impetus and guides for social innovation. Read on.

They cannot scare me with their empty spaces
Between stars – on stars where no human race is.
I have it in me so much nearer home
To scare myself with my own desert places.

— Robert Frost

(cited by Frances Westley, Opening Address, May 28, SIX Vancouver)

June 4: Powerful Lessons Learned

Innovating for Caregivers at the SIX Summer School - Powerful Lessons Learned

Innovating for Caregivers at the SIX Summer School – Powerful Lessons Learned

I learned that we must forge a movement to place power in the language of caregiving…” In her second post, Donna draws on the experiences of leading change lab and solutions lab practitioners, who led a session on “Experimenting with Enemies and Strangers.” The session leaders focused on the immeasurable potential and value of collectively co-creating new social realities and solutions — a process that requires balancing love with power, or as Donna shares, empowering the language of care with strength against silence or dismissal.  In her reflection, Donna calls on caregivers to use the fire of love to light a powerful torch for collective creation, nurtured through care. Read on

Microtainer: social innovation & lab links we’re following (Feb 2014)

This mini blog, or bloggette, is part of our ongoing effort to spread information that we think will be interesting, insightful and useful to lab practitioners and the lab-curious. Below is a collection of resources that crossed the desks of Hyun-Duck Chung (MaRS Solutions Lab) and Satsuko VanAntwerp (SiG) over the month of February 2014. In no particular order:

  1. Blog post by Fast company with a round up of alternative design education options that “won’t break the bank” (ie. from $25/month to around 10K, instead of 100K and 4 years). Includes online options, pop-up design courses and boot camps from the likes of Austin Centre for Design, Stanford D.school, Behance, etc (found via Alexander Dirksen).

  1. Article on “The Nexus Effect: When Leaders Span Group Boundaries” highlighting three stories of cross-sector, multi-stakeholder partnerships and how this approach to leadership is becoming increasingly important for our changing times.

  1. This past Saturday, OCAD’s Situation Lab hosted a design jam, called Futurematic, where the group designed and created products from the future using the Extrapolation Lab’s foresight methodology. These products are in a vending machine in the main OCAD building — don’t miss this glimpse into the future: go see them for yourself! (My fave: In Touch – how do you really feel?) Stuart, we hope you will host more of these soon!

  1. Article in Stanford’s Social Innovation Review about how funders are exploring the deliberate reintroduction of risk-taking (ie. incorporating learning from failure and trial & error tinkering) into their processes and portfolios, in order to catalyze breakthrough change. Also, this blog post by Nesta’s Philip Colligan and Helen Goulden talks about how labs can make better funding decisions.

  1. A guide to prototyping new ideas put together by Nesta and ThinkPublic.

  1. Article highlighting nine strategies to deliver impact at scale distilled from Year Up’s lived experience of “scaling what works” (note: also appeared in SSIR). For another angle on the topic of scaling, check out this super interesting blog post exploring “Innovation for Development: Scaling Up or Evolving?” by Giulio Quagiotto, UN Global Pulse Lab, and Milica Begovic Radojevic, UNDP Europe & Central Asia. Also, this e-book,Scaling: Small Smart Moves For Outsized Results,” explores how to achieve big goals using minimal efforts.

  1. Two great publications from Accenture on public sector innovation: “Delivering Public Service for the Future: Navigating the Shifts” describes four profound structural shifts and a corresponding framework of practical actions governments can take to deliver the public service outcomes they want at a cost that can be sustained. “Radically Rethinking Public Services” makes the case for citizen-centred public services that are co-designed with citizens — in order to lower the cost of service delivery, while improving citizen outcomes (reminded of Nesta’s Radical Efficiency model, also awesome)

  1. Report and implementation how-to guide:Public & Collaborative: Designing Services for Housing” by Public Policy Lab, New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development and Parsons DESIS Lab, brings together 18 months of discovery and co-design with agency staff, service providers, and New York City residents. The report illustrates how the team applied user research and service design methods to the provision of housing services.

  1. Blog post by Momenteer Erika Bailey about culture and behaviour change and why discomfort is part of the process: “It Gets Worse Before It Gets Better – A Cautionary Tale.”

  1. Article in FastcoExist, “How To Turn Colleges Into Incubators For Changemaking Design,” provides five tips for reaching out to colleges. The article also makes the case for seasoned designers to work with design students in order to plant the seed for a future in social good design.

  1. Book:Enabling City 2” (and this cute, short video: Your Imagination Matters) by Chiara Camponeschi. In the words of MindLab’s Christian Bason, “Chiara Camponeschi has written a powerful contribution to our thinking about the future of cities. Collectively, the essays, articles and cases presented in this volume provide more than insight and inspiration – they demonstrate the emergence of a very different kind of urban reality: human, sharing, inclusive, resilient, innovative. The ideas in this book should influence anyone involved with urban and civic development, whether professionally or personally. Enabling City will be a tremendously valuable resource for many years to come.”

  1. Online version of Kennisland’s Annual Report for 2013 — beautifully designed and highlighting some great achievements including: a neighbourhood crowdfunding initiative, a series on social design for complex societal problems (the wicked series), and a social innovation lab gathering with leading labs from around the world (can you spot SiG@Waterloo’s own Sam Laban in the picture?).

  1. Excellent write up by Nesta’s Geoff Mulgan about public sector labs and social innovation labs: what are they, background, different methods, different typologies, and some great questions for the future of lab practice.

  1. Blog post exploring the differences between social entrepreneurship vs. social innovation (I’ve found this paper by France Westley helpful in defining this difference, particularly figure 1 on page 4).

  1. Fascinating summary of the book, The Moral Imagination: The Art & Soul of Building Peace, by John Paul Lederach – explores the theory of moral imagination, which has many overlaps with movement building, partnership brokering, facilitation, non-violent communications… all in the name of developing solutions (co-designing them!) to tough social challenges. The summary also has a lot of great metaphors: spiders and webs, partnerships, yeast – catalysts for movements.

  1. Blog post summarizing thoughts and perspectives from GovLab Ideas Luncheon Series on “Applying Human Centred Design Principles to Public Problems” with Jesper Christiansen of MindLab. Jesper illustrates the concept by talking about the Ministry of Employment’s approach to transforming the employment system — a cornerstone of their social welfare system and a significant public expenditure.

  1. The Natural Step’s Sustainable Transition Lab has updated the stages in their lab process on their website. Check out what happens during Pre-lab, Phase I, II, and III.

  1. Interesting blog post by Joe Julier, researcher at FutureGov and London’s DESIS Lab, exploring whether social design is a new tool for a designer’s toolkit or whether it is becoming ingrained in design philosophy (found via Terrie Chan).

  2. This is very cool: “ReFraming: The Art of Thinking Differently” is a website that takes you through, step-by-step, to help you reframe a situation or challenge – that is, to see the other side of the coin.

What have we missed? What lab-related links have you been following this past month?

Hyun-Duck & Satsuko

Sustainability-driven Collaboration, Part III: Simplicity without reduction, authentic leadership, and process design

In the previous entry in this three-part series on Sustainability-driven Collaboration, I discussed value creation and vision as key drivers of collaboration: how shared and individual value keep collaborators at the table working towards collective goals and how an ambitious, principle-based vision of success (sustainability) can provide creative tension and serve as a powerful driving force for such  multi-stakeholder initiatives.

Based on experience and research at the organizational level, I believe that the following three lessons are just as important for improving the capacity of collaborative efforts to achieve transformational systems change towards sustainability.

1. Simplify without reduction – Whether at the scale of individual organizations or in the context of multi-stakeholder collaborative efforts, achieving transformational outcomes in an increasingly complex world requires us to acknowledge and deal with complexity as best we can. Given the multiple competing priorities and dynamics at play even in small organizations, it is true that: “whether building companies, steering governments, or achieving personal goals, avoiding complexity isn’t the answer anymore.

Simplifying, while not reducing or dismissing complexity, becomes that much more important in multi-stakeholder collaborative contexts. Approaches such as Change Labs have emphasized the need to embrace complexity and use detailed systems mapping and similar practices to identify leverage points for change.

Yet most of us cannot hold complicated systems maps in our heads as we make decisions day to day. Creating systems maps to reveal connections, complexities, and leverage points can be powerful, but  individuals and groups can quickly get lost in complexity. Using a systems perspective on an ongoing basis therefore requires simplification without reduction, a process that involves being able to recognize patterns.

For example, the system conditions for sustainability are a useful lens through which individuals and groups can identify patterns that make sense of complicated systems maps about current reality,  highlight strategic leverage points, and guide the adaptive processes of trial and error and rapid prototyping that are necessary for innovation.

2. Demonstrate authentic leadership – The importance of effective leadership is no secret to anyone who has tried to make change happen.  For sustainability-driven change in organizations, leaders play an integral role in helping develop shared assumptions and beliefs about the importance of sustainability to long-term success, shared understanding about what sustainability means, and shared language with which to describe sustainability issues.

In multi-stakeholder collaboration, authentic and effective leadership is just as crucial. Leaders issue the call to collaborate, frame the narrative of the desired and emerging transformational change, and encourage participants to be comfortable with accepting the emergent and uncertain outcomes that characterize collaboration. Leaders can also visibly model the behaviors so important to collaboration. Baan, Long, and Pearlman, authors of The Lotushave described 9 personal capacities for transformational leadership. These capacities include having compassion, generating whole system and whole-self awareness, holding paradoxes and ambiguities, and maintaining a sense of humour.

Otto Scharmer’s Theory U: Leading from the Emerging Future provides the definitive word on leadership aimed at transformational change. According to Scharmer, the primary job of leadership is “to enhance the individual and systematic capacity to see, to deeply attend to the reality that people face and enact. Thus the leader’s real work is to help people discover the power of seeing and seeing together.”

3. Design good processes – Sustainability-driven change within organizations doesn’t just happen through compelling words, good indicators, best practices, or even strong leadership. It takes special attention to the social processes that foster creativity, hope, and ambition in this work. Getting people to interact with different people and in different ways than they usually do via carefully designed processes that respect the way adults learn is vitally important for the work to be enduring and the change to be transformational. As explained in Frances Westley, Sean Goebey, and Kirsten Robinson’s Change Lab/Design Lab for Social Innovation, clear processes “are there to provide the direction and put momentum behind a change-making project, not stifle its creativity.” 

In a multi-stakeholder context, the importance of clear process is amplified by the absence of any particular unifying organizational structure, the necessity for widely differing viewpoints, and the stronger likelihood of mistrust among individuals. Trust is the most important ingredient for success in a multi-stakeholder collaboration and building trust is the most important process design challenge. Helping people be present and honest, while articulating and respectfully opening up to points of disagreement, requires careful process design and facilitation.

A lack of clarity in role definition is also an extremely common problem in collaborations. Well-defined processes can help by  “providing all participants with a sense of where their workshops are going and how the work they are currently doing, researching, sense-making, or prototyping will fit into broader system change.”

TNSblog2Given the challenges, it is no surprise that social innovation labs that offer models on how to actually run collaborative efforts have become so popular. The emphasis of the Lab approach on careful process design, the engagement of diverse stakeholders from across a whole system, and the messy, emergent nature of such endeavors means that Labs tend to require a significant investment of resources and a hefty time commitment from stakeholders.

Advancing the important and emerging practice of Sustainability-driven Collaboration

With all of these lessons and questions in mind, The Natural Step Canada has developed and launched a program called the Sustainability Transition Lab. We aim to blend the lessons that we’ve learned about facilitating transformational change at the organizational level with the best practices that enable change in a multi-stakeholder context.

We think that it is possible to accelerate change in sustainability-driven collaborations by consciously designing the process to build a principle-based vision, shared language, and widespread sustainability literacy among participants. Our bet is that this helps build buy-in and alignment more rapidly and provides helpful design constraints to guide and spur innovation efforts.

In collaboration with a number of partners, we plan to test this hypothesis through a series of projects over the next three years. This effort will itself be an experiment and we will share our learnings – successes, failures, outcomes, and results – as we go.

For more information about the Sustainability Transition Lab, please visit: naturalstep.ca/sustainability-transition-lab.

Want to engage further in the conversation about sustainability-driven collaboration? The Natural Step Canada is excited to host the 2nd annual Accelerate: Collaborating for Sustainability Conference on June 5-6, 2014, in Toronto. Join us to deepen learning about collaboration from experts and practitioners, experience collaboration by creating connections with other change agents, and seed new collaborative initiatives. As an Endorsing Partner of Accelerate, members and friends of the SiG community are encouraged to use the Exclusive Partner Discount Code SIG10 to automatically save 10% when registering. Learn more and register today!

Microtainer: social innovation & lab links we’re following (Dec 2013 & Jan 2014)

This mini blog, or bloggette, is part of our ongoing effort to spread information that we think will be interesting, insightful and useful to lab practitioners and the lab-curious. Below is a collection of resources that crossed our desks over the months of December 2013 and January 2014. In no particular order:

  1. Article by Zaid Hassan exploring “what are social laboratories?” — Zaid explains that social labs are social, experimental and systemic. For a quick glance, check out Zaid’s webinar and slides via the ALIA Institute. For a deeper dive, check out his website and newly launched (this past monday!) book: the social lab revolution.

  1. Article about the UK Government’s design lab pilot: a Policy Lab to apply design principles to policy-making and public service.  Additional links in the article about the benefits of applying design in policy making.

  1. Awesome map of the global government lab landscape and website acting as a hub of information on the public innovation spaces — prepared by Daniela Selloni (Polimi DESIS Lab) and Eduardo Staszowski (Parsons DESIS Lab), Christian Bason (MindLab) and Andrea Schneider (Public By Design).

  1. Operating much like a think tank within the Singapore Government, the Centre for Strategic Futures acts on what will be the important challenges of the tomorrow — aiming to create an agile public sector in Singapore.

  1. Nesta’s Geoff Mulgan writes an excellent paper about design in government and social innovation and blog post with smart suggestions for making the case for social innovation to elected officials.

  1. Media update and project summary about the European Design Innovation Platform (EDIP) – a project to increase the use of design for innovation and growth across Europe, financed by the European Commission and in collaboration with Design Council, MindLab and others.

  1. Online mentoring and training program about Gov 3.0 offered by The Governance Lab (GovLab) out of NYU. The website also provides thinking and exploration into the notion of Gov3.0 (different from gov 2.0).

  1. ReportRestarting Britain 2” by Design Council explores the impact of design on public, private and design sectors and shows that the best of design thinking can help to make (public) services more relevant to current needs and reduce cost.

  1. PaperThe Journey to the Interface: how public sector design can connect user to reform” by UK-based think tank Demos explores public service design and it’s relationship with citizen engagement and co-production.

  1. Upcoming book (September 2014 release) “Design for Policy” by MindLab’s Christian Bason provides a detailed analysis of design as a tool for addressing public problems and capturing opportunities for achieving better and more efficient societal outcomes for citizens and governments (ie. co-design, co-creation, co-production). Also see Christian’s latest blog post: 2014 will be the year of Experimentation talking about the shifting narrative in the public sector around learning from failure (and along the experimentation vein, don’t miss the upcoming Fail Forward Festival coming to Toronto in July).

  1. Great blog and master’s program on service innovation and design offered by the Laurea University of Applied Sciences in Espoo, Finland. Also, there is a PhD in design for public services out of the AHO university in Oslo, Norway.

  1. Excellent articulation of empathy — this video by RSA Shorts to the soothing voice of Brene Brown (of the Tedtalk on vulnerability) and this bookRealizing Empathy” by Slim (thanks to Andrea Hamilton for letting me know about this great talk at Rotman as part of Rotman’s ongoing speaker series… last night was David Kelley of IDEO and coming up is Geoff Mulgan).

  1. Explanation of a powerful convening technique called “Peer Input Process” via the Tamarack Institute. Peer Input Process is a technique was designed to assist people obtain input from peers in a relatively quick and structured way.

  1. Blog post about embracing difference and how cultivating our ability to collaborate among diverse stakeholders will allow us to create truly transformative change. Written by the wonderfully articulate art of hosting steward Tuesday Ryan-Hart.

  1. Blog post on the Good website “From Pools to School Lunches: Why public interest design is changing the way we do things” overflowing with exciting projects at the intersect of design x public (and societal) good.

  1. Blog post by Amanda Mundy of The Moment about the journey and lessons learned from designing and setting up their innovation studio.

  1. The audio from a Metro Morning (radio) interview with John Brodhead exploring the future of public transportation and engaging in cross-sector collaborations. In this article, John also talks about his upcoming initiative “100 in 1 Day” where 100 urban ‘interventions’ will spring up across to Toronto in June (inspired by Montreal, Copenhagen and Bagota).

  2. The bookHappy City: Transforming our lives through urban design” by Charles Montgomery from the Museum of Vancouver (and MOV’s CityLab) gets rave reviews in the New York Times (glad I got this book for my BFF’s birthday!).

  3. Great concept: Pop Up Parks! The idea was part of Design Council’s Knee High Design Challenge (more info about the challenge and the other awesome projects ideas here). Also interesting on the topic of parks is Nesta paperRethinking Parks”, which highlights the need for new business models to run parks, given cuts in government funding, and discusses 20 international examples of how parks innovators are doing just that. (check out the Nesta’s Rethinking Parks contest to submit your ideas)

– Satsuko

Microtainer: social innovation & lab links we’re following (November 2013)

This mini blog, or bloggette, is part of our ongoing effort to spread information that we think will be interesting, insightful and useful to lab practitioners and the lab-curious. Below is a collection of resources that crossed the desks of Hyun-Duck Chung (MaRS Solutions Lab) and Satsuko VanAntwerp (SiG) over the month of November 2013. In no particular order:

1. The UK Cabinet Office announces that they will be launching a policy lab in Dec 2014. This lab will work with government departments to tackle their toughest problems drawing on service design and human centred design methods. Rather than the focus being on greater internal efficiency, the lab will focus on creating better outcomes for end users (citizens).

2. Awesome manifestos by Brute Labs (design and tech studio with all-volunteer team that has launched 11 social change projects around the world) and InWithForward (the latest project by Sarah Schulman + Jonas, Dan, Yani).

3. Article by Beth Kanter “Seven Truths about Change to Lead By and Live By” expanding on great quotes including: “Change is a threat when done to me, but an opportunity when done by me”, “Change is a campaign, not a decision”, and “Everything can look like a failure in the middle”.

4. Report by nef’s Lucie Stephens and Julia Slay: Co-production in Mental Health: a literature review. The report looks at how co-production is being used in the mental health field, i.e. what evidence there is of the impact of co-production on mental health support, and which aspects of co-production are being developed in the sector.

5. Blog post by MindLab’s Christian Bason: Is the public sector more innovative than we think? Christian hypothesizes that the public sector is better at innovation than the private sector.

6. Super interesting talk by Indy Johar “Do it for (y)ourself” bursting with ideas for community-led social change, reflections on the challenge of scale, and the tension of ‘the craft’ and ‘the knowledge economy’, all in less than 20mins.

7. Reminded of these great method cards by IDEO: a 51 card deck to inspire design.

8. Another great article in the guardian about public service design. This one looks at asking quesitons, embracing risk and user-centred design. ‘Get creative: eight tips for designing better public services

9. Blog post by Nesta’s Laura Bunt exploring whether we need to find a better definition for social innovation.

10. Report exploring the relationship between Art and Resilience and how fortifying a city’s social and cultural fabric is just as (or more?) important as upgrading a city’s emergency response, planners, policy makers, social innovators, etc.

11. Metcalf report by reknowned ecological economists Tim Jackson and Peter Victor about work-life balance, wellbeing and the green economy at the community scale.

12. Recent blog posts by Assaf Weis on the sharing economy (Sharing Can Truly Disrupt Business) and Kaitlin Almack on building partnerships (Increasing the Impact of CSR Through Multi-Stakeholder Collaborations)

13. Infographic comparing ‘old design thinking’ with human centered design and co-design

14. Issue No. 2 of The Alpine Review includes articles by Bryan Boyer (about cultures of decision making) and Dan Hill (about Fabrica).

15. Awesome graphic recorders and facilitators: ThinkLink Graphics, Ripple Think Inc, PlaythinkDScribe. Also, see this monthly meet-up for visual thinkers.

What have we missed? We invite you to share in the comment section the resources that you’ve come across recently that you think would be interesting to this community!

– Hyun-Duck and Satsuko

Microtainer: social innovation & lab links we’re following (October 2013)

This mini blog, or bloggette, is part of our ongoing effort to spread information that we think will be interesting, insightful and useful to lab practitioners and the lab-curious. Below is a collection of resources that crossed our desks over the month of October 2013. In no particular order:

1. Excellent list of resources about public sector innovation following a conference in Switzerland: REDESIGN:GOV. Event tagline: “Is there hope to make government more innovative?”

2. Reflective blog posts following a Toronto lab practitioners gathering in September. Julie Sommerfreund, via theToronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) blog, explores the nature of complex problems in her post: Wicked problems need wicked cool solutions. Kaitlin Almack blogs about Leading Boldly Network’s theory of change in her post: Exploring Collaborative Social Innovation; and Courtney Lawrence reflects on the well being and the human element in her post: Emotions In Innovation.

3. Video interviews, panel discussions and talks from ‘CityLab: Urban Solutions to Global Challenges”, an event that brought together 300 global city leaders for a series of conversations about urban ideas that are shaping the world’s metro centers.

4. Zaid Hassan of Reos Partners launched a new book: The Social Labs Revolution. During  April 21-29, Zaid will be touring Canada to offer training workshops drawing on his experience in addressing complex challenges. Also see his excellent summary of the Change Lab approach, his recent post on the NESTA blog, and this facebook group.

5. The bookPublic and Collaborative: Exploring The Intersection of Design, Social Innovation and Public Policy” includes 11 articles that presents labs’ projects and activities during 2012-2013. The book has four themes: 1) Designing New Relationships Between People and the State, 2) Design Schools as Agents of Change, 3) Experimental Places for Social and Public Innovation, 4) Collaborative Design Methods and Tools: The Teen Art Park Project. The book was edited and coordinated by Ezio Manzini and Eduardo Staszowski of the DESIS Labs network with 23 authors — including Toronto’s Luigi Ferrara of Institute without Boundaries.

7. Slides and videos from MindLab’s “How Public Design” gathering in September, including a short video interview with MaRS Solutions Lab Director Joeri van den Steenhoven talking about “Institutionalizing Design Practice” and Kennisland Director Chris Sigaloff talking about “How To Use Design” in the public sector.

8. ReportWhen Bees Meet Trees” explores how large social sector organisations can help to scale social innovation (with support from NESTA)

9. Excellent website about using human centred design to improve campus mental health: Mental Health x Design. Developed through a joint project between OCAD University and Ryerson University in Toronto (curated by Andrea Yip) asking “How do we design systems and structures that will lead to more creative and mentally healthy campus communities?”.

10. Awesome blog by MaRS Solutions Lab’s latest addition, Terrie Chan, exploring the intersection of design x social innovation, ie. human-centered design, service design, systems design, and the methodology of design-thinking.

11. Reos Partners, with support from the J.W. McConnell foundation, produced this great paper on Change Labs that we recently re-discovered.

12. Short video explaining Berkana’s Two-Loops theory of systems change. I find this diagram really helpful to see where we are in systems and our role in changing them. We all have a role.

13. Website and platform ‘Learn Do Share’ is a book series, a set of collaborative experiments and methods, and a resource and r&d collective for open collaboration, design fiction & social innovation. It is closely tied to a Toronto-based gathering called diy days.

14. Article of an interview with Adam Kahane. Adam shares his thinking, reflections and valuable lessons from over two decades working in systems change, conflict brokering, and collaborating with unlikely allies.

15. Inspiring Tedx Talk by Ashoka Fellow, Founder of Time Bank USA and pioneer of poverty law, Dr. Edgar Cahn. In this talk he explains the concept of Time banking and Co-Production. The Time Banking UK website further explores the links and relationship between time banking and co-production, which is valuable to think about when developing solutions to complex challenges.

What have we missed? We invite you to share in the comment section the resources that you’ve come across recently that you think would be interesting to this community!

– Satsuko

Microtainer: social innovation & lab links we’re following (September 2013)

This mini blog, or bloggette, is part of our ongoing effort to spread information that we think will be interesting, insightful and useful to lab practitioners and the lab-curious. Below is a collection of resources that crossed the desks of Hyun-Duck Chung (MaRS Solutions Lab) and Satsuko VanAntwerp (SiG) over the month of September 2013. In no particular order:

1. List of books, articles, and other readings related to simulations for social innovation labs put together by Mark Tovey of SiG@Waterloo. Topics include: social innovation, policy, modelling social and political systems, tools for groups, toolkits, information design, and interaction design.

2. Report about ‘Design for Public Good’ that includes tools for enhancing government innovation and public service design and twelve case studies. Cases include MindLab’s ‘Young Taxpayers’ project and a profile about Helsinki Design Lab. The report’s authors are Design for Public Good and SEE (Sharing Experiences Europe) Platform.

3. New book about citizen-focused government: Putting Citizens First. Academics and practitioners from around the globe share stories about putting the citizen in the center of public development. MindLab’s Christian Bason talks about user involvement in Chapter 5 ‘Engaging Citizens in Policy Innovation’.

4. Guidebook on hosting meaningful conversations: Gather: The Art and Science of Effective Convening’ from the Rockefeller Foundation by The Rockefeller Foundation and The Monitor Institute. The guidebook covers the essentials of planning and executing effective gatherings, including: deciding whether to convene, clarifying a “north star” purpose, and making design choices that flow from that purpose, design principles, key questions, and critical issues to be considered and customized per situation.

5. NoTosh is a UK company that applies design thinking to teach and learn anything, working with schools and corporations alike. One of their recent blog posts covers Hexagonal Thinking: an effective way to help learners synthesize ideas by allowing them to quickly model different ways of organizing their thoughts. As hexagonal syntheses are often unique to individual team members, it can be used to highlight areas of uncertainty, gaps in connecting existing material, and guide subsequent ideation and prototyping work.

6. Talk by MaRS Solutions Lab Director Joeri van den Steenhoven at the RQIS (Réseau québécois en innovation sociale) conference “L’innovation sociale, un enjeu mondial”. The introduction is in French but Joeri’s talk is in English.

7. Creative Confidence is the latest collaborative project of the Kelley brothers David (founder of IDEO and Stanford’s d.school) and Tom (partner at IDEO and executive fellow at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business). Designed as a tool kit for developing creative confidence in everyone, the book includes ideas and activities that help readers to apply design thinking and processes into their personal and professional lives. The anecdotes illustrate examples of how others have done it, while providing an insider’s look into their respective organizations. David’s TedTalk (2012) provides a preview if you can’t wait for the book to come out in October 2013.

8. The Solution Revolution launched in Toronto this month. William D. Eggers & Paul Macmillan of Deloitte provides a highly readable synthesis on “how business, government, and social enterprises are teaming up to solve society’s toughest problems”. Chapter by chapter the book highlights the key players, technologies, scalable business models, new types of currencies and exchanges that are creating an exciting ecosystem of possibilities. A must-read for anyone tackling local and global challenges to create better solutions.

9. The Center for Urban Pedagogy’s (CUP) produces a “series of foldout posters that use graphic design to explore and explain public policy”. Produced four times a year, each poster is a collaborative output of a designer, an advocate, and CUP. Visit their Making Policy Public site for project schedules and submission guidelines.

10. Reflective blog posts about the state of Canada’s Lab practice by Chris Lee and Ben McCammon following a lab practitioners gathering. Chris explores human-centered design theory and complexity and asks “What is the cost of not building relationships?” in his post: Spinning Plates & Relationships. Ben guides us through a series of questions to start to unravel systems change concepts in his post: You Say You Want Systems Change.

11. Very clear and accessible definition of ‘wicked problems’ from a business and design lens. Also a useful link list to other resources. This gem was put together by the smart folks at The Austin Centre for Design.

12. A Problem Solving Primer, put together by the Australian government’s DesignGov team, is a collection of answers from decision makers, practitioners and all-around talented people around four questions: 1) What one thing would you recommend when dealing with limited resources and competing priorities? 2) What is the key thing to remember when you are confronted by complex problems? 3) When you’re confronted with a difficult issue, where do you start? 4) What is your favourite tool or technique to use in problem solving?

13. In the paperFriendly Hacking Into The Public Sector: Co-creating Public Policies Within Regional Governments’, Public Innovation Lab La 27e Region share their lessons learned and experiences with conducting fifteen experiments with nine regional administrations in France. The paper highlights the key components of friendly hacking, a framework for implementing radical innovation in the public administration context.

14. Three blog reflections from MindLab’s How Public Design seminar among lab practitioners and international innovation gurus. MaRS Solutions Lab’s Joeri van den Steenhoven explores the impact of labs and how design-led innovations can help government in his post: ‘Design Innovation and Government’. Kennisland’s Dr. Sarah Schulman explores the implications of lab solutions and of building the Lab practice in her post: ‘Means and Ends’. MindLab’s Jesper Christiansen explores what we mean by public design and take-aways from conversations at the session in his post: “How Public Design: exploring a new conversation #1” (keeping an eye out for a #2!).

15. Reflective blog posts about co-production in Canada following the Toronto Co-Production Meetup with nef’s Lucy Stephens. Lucy Gao explores the similarities, differences and overlaps between Co-Production and Collaborative Consumption in her post: ‘What Is Co-Production and How Does It Relate To Collaborative Consumption’. Melissa Tulio shares her perspective and application to the Ontario Public Service and the six elements of co-production in her post: ‘Co-Production: learnings from Lucie Stephens’. Terrie Chan explores wellbeing, public service design and the power of partnerships and collaboration in her post: ‘Putting The Public Back In Public Services And Policies: What Co-Production And Pop-Ups Can Teach Us’.

16. The bookDesign Forward: Creative Strategies for Sustainable Change’ explores how design can be used as a strategic and holistic way of finding and creating sustainable and successful solutions. Written by Frog Design founder Hartmut Esslinger.

What have we missed? We invite you to share in the comment section the resources that you’ve come across recently that you think would be interesting to this community!

Hyun-Duck and Satsuko

Social Innovation Musings

My first three weeks at SiG have flown by. As the newest member of SiG National’s team, I’ve had to hit the ground sprinting. I joined the SiG team to help accelerate our work in supporting the growth of Canada’s ecosystem for enabling social innovation, with a particular focus on sharing the valuable contribution Labs can make. You may be asking: what exactly is a Lab? There are a lot of definitions floating around. In the social innovation space, a Lab is a powerful tool used to develop holistic solutions to complex social problems (particularly those problems that have become resistant to traditional solutions). To help make all of this more clear, we are constantly updating and developing new resources viewable on the SiG website.

(image via pinterest)

As a quick peak inside my brain, here are a couple of current musings around Labs and social innovation that have piqued my interest.
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