Social Innovation Nation

SiG Note: This article was originally published by The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation in their June 2014 Newsletter.  It has been cross-posted with permission from the author.

9c3906ff5c7a03c2fc161a81_280x216Recent events suggest that the field of social innovation is maturing to the point where it is possible to envisage adaptive, evolutionary shifts in our social, economic, and environmental systems.

Consider: May 26, MaRS Solutions Lab hosted Labs for Systems Change—the third and largest global gathering of practitioners leading this type of work. In her remarks to the gathering, Frances Westley— J.W. McConnell Chair in Social Innovation at the University of Waterloo—described how our understanding of psychology and group dynamics; design thinking; and complex adaptive systems theory—together with data analysis and computer modeling—affords us new ability to examine and improve institutional behaviour, and to generate testable solutions to wicked problems.

Meanwhile, May 26-30 was Social Innovation Week in Vancouver, produced by BC Partners for Social Impact and SiG. A public Ideas Jam and an academic conference were among several events surrounding the global Social Innovation Exchange (SIX) Summer School, which Canada was hosting for the first time. SIX Vancouver 2014 was opened by BC’s Minister of Social Innovation—Canada’s first—who predicted that in five years every government will follow suit—crowdsourcing ideas, introducing hybrid corporate structures, employing new social finance measures, and supporting civic engagement in the search for solutions to our most pressing challenges.

With its recent announcement of a $1 billion endowment for social and cultural innovation, Alberta is also moving in this direction.

This is not just work for governments, corporations, philanthropic foundations, and community organizations. A recent blog by Joe Hsueh, of Foundation partner Second Muse, titled Why the Human Touch is Key to Unlocking Systems Change, quotes Peter Senge: “What is most systemic is most personal.” A reminder that change begins with ourselves—with shifts in our own habits, and our customary ways of seeing and dealing with others.

Stephen Huddart, President & CEOThe J.W. McConnell Family Foundation

Learn more about these social innovation events and policies:
Labs for Systems Change
Social Innovation Week Vancouver
Social Innovation Exchange (SIX) Summer School Vancouver 2014 
Social Innovation Endowment (SIE) Alberta
Social Innovation Canada 2014
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Stephen Huddart About Stephen Huddart

Stephen Huddart is the President and CEO of the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation

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