Social Enterprise Spotlight: Building Capacity for Partnerships

Ros Tennyson has been in the business of partnerships for over 20 years. In her role as the Development Director of the Partnership Brokers Association, Ros delivers a comprehensive range of training courses designed to build the skills, confidence and competencies necessary to broker partnerships effectively. We’re excited that Ros will be moderating at the Social Enterprise World Forum in the breakout session, “Culture Shock: Engaging Others in Your Success.” Just in time for the forum’s launch next week, SiG had the opportunity to speak with Ros about developing partnership competencies for social change.

Why are partnerships helpful to creating social change?

Ros: If partnerships weren’t needed, they wouldn’t be necessary. In other words, if society worked the way we’d like it to work, we wouldn’t have any need for cross-sector collaboration. If each sector – government, business, civil society and international agencies – were able to function at their optimum capacity, then things would be fine. We would have a complex coherent world interrelated with each other in appropriate ways. The reality is that no one sector really functions particularly well. Most sectors are finding they are failing to deliver on their own goals and wider societal goals. So suddenly, the whole idea of working together to collaborate to make change seems extremely attractive.

PBA-Logo-Pantone-Landscape

How can we as individuals and organizations develop a more collaborative culture, particularly across sectors and continents, to address the systemic intractable issues of our society?

Ros: I think human nature is quite complex and there is a tendency to think that collaboration is just business as usual, straightforward. The tendency is to think:

Of course we’re all human beings, we get on with each other, we know how to make good relationships, therefore it shouldn’t be any kind of major problem to learn how to collaborate.

I believe the reality is quite different. The ability to break boundaries – to be boundary spanners requires quite a radical challenge to one’s assumptions and mindsets. One has to really question how one thinks about other sectors and countries in order to operate differently. I think certainly in the west, we’ve grown up with a certain culture of possessiveness, of thinking we have to know best, thinking we’re right. And actually we don’t necessarily know best and we’re not necessarily right. Actually a much more open and honest way to proceed is to see things as a dialogue, where everyone is discovering and learning how to do things, rather than some people thinking they have the answers and trying to coerce others into accepting their own point of view. It’s sounds like a complex answer but I think collaboration is not business as usual. It takes reframed skills and it takes the kind of people who are willing to adapt and move outside their own comfort zone perhaps, for the benefit of a bigger purpose. And actually when the chips are down – however liberal or liberated we think we are – we are all fond of our comfort zones. In fact, the challenge to change towards a genuinely more collaborative model is quite a big one.

Are there ways to prepare or hone the ability to be out of one’s comfort zone, as well as encourage other people to take that leap?

Ros: I’d describe it as both an art and a science. The art element is being able to envision something different, to know what you’re aspiring towards and therefore making the right journey to get to that goal. The goal has to be forward looking, future-looking. It has to be based on attentiveness, listening, intuition, on understanding what is needed now, on making the most of what you have, instead of some preconceived idea that you are trying to impose. That’s the art of it. But to do this well, art and intuition are not enough. You also have to be rigorous, technical, scientific, meticulous, business-like, astute, and persistent. These are very different kinds of attributes. So the ideal practitioner in this space, as a partnership broker or intermediary, will be able to see which of those things (art or science) they do naturally and work quite hard to develop the other side of themselves so they can do both.

The Social Enterprise World Forum is a gathering of 1,200 social impact champions from various sectors and associations around the world. What excites you about attending the event?

SEWFRos: I’ve been working partnership brokering for the last 20 years and only when I was invited by Social Innovation Generation to speak at a MaRS conference two years ago did I find myself in a room full of social innovators. As I started to hear people speak, I suddenly realized that I was amongst my peers. What I registered is that although my work is in the realm of partnership brokering, as an individual I’m basically a social innovator, so I feel very naturally drawn towards that world. I’m extremely excited to hear how much that world has developed in Canada, as social innovators seem very central in Canada. It does feel like a privilege to be in a room full of social innovators because I think the world really needs it. Of course, the big question for me is what is the interface between social innovation and partnership brokering and partnership development? Since the two worlds have similar qualities and are useful to one another, they seem to support, inform and reinforce each other.

 

 

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Devon Krainer About Devon Krainer

Devon was the Project Coordinator for SIX Summer School Vancouver 2014 and a researcher with SiG.

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